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Cake day: Jul 26, 2020

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My initial claim was:

Aren’t you the person who went around fedi a few weeks ago and threatened fedi admins with legal action?

You said:

I can’t see any threat of legal actions

I provided the proof.

And because of your report about CP to mstdn.social

Still waiting for any kind of proof of that. Hint: there isn’t one, because I have never reported anyone for that kind of material.

And then you want to tell me, who has been in the Fediverse since ostatus

My ancient identi.ca account is here, if we want to talk OStatus. Care to share yours?

that you have so much more experience in administration and moderation?

I never claimed that I do. I said that fedi admins do. And provided a link to back that up.

And that you’re mentioned in that toot is only, because the Mastodon client added you autmatically.

Well if someone is throwing around legal threats, perhaps they could go the extra mile to be clear in who they are meant for? “Sorry, Your Honor, this account was mentioned accidentally” is not a great strategy here. And since I have no way of knowing what’s in the head of a person writing something like this, I can only base my reading of sich a threat on what is actually, you know, written there. 🤷‍♀️

But for you, everything is about you anyway, and you also refer to everything directly as an attack on you. 🤦 My gosh, your ego must have suffered.

Indeed, I am completely broken by the revelation that a legal threat by some rando on the Internet is not, in fact, directed at me. Hartbreaking.

Very thankful that there are people around reasonable enough to react to a fediblock by threatening legal action to fedi admins (btw, thanks for letting me know Stux is also targeted, I had no clear proof there are multiple fedi admins targeted, now I do!). People who totally aren’t making this “about themselves”. Internet truly is a wondrous place!


I have never once reported a profile for “child pornography”, as I have so far been fortunate enough to never have bumped into that on fedi. But sure, whatever. 😄

EDIT: I can’t see any threat of legal actions. But you don’t care, because you interpret what you want into what was written 🤦

Well, the OP is actually talking about “requests” being “forwarded” to their lawyer right in their post, so there’s that. But if you need a more clear proof, here you are. Directed at me and at a specific fediadmin.

I eagerly await any proof of your claims about my “reporting profiles because of child pornography” now. I’m sure you have them, you wouldn’t be making such strong claims otherwise, now would you?


Wait, I remembered something. Aren’t you the person who went around fedi a few weeks ago and threatened fedi admins with legal action? And then threatened me with legal action too just because I boosted one fedadmin’s toot that was not even directly mentioning you?

Yes. Yes indeed you are!

I really do wonder why people are inclined to block you and your instance. Truly a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, wrapped in an enigma.



anarchy and dictatorship

Wow, both at the same time? That’s an achievement!

And those who are so hungry for consent, you should think about whether you #FediBlocker have the consent for your nonsense?

Yes. Yes they do. The consent required is not of blocked instances or their users, but of users on the blocking instance. You do not need consent from the spammer to block spam. You do not need consent from a troll to block a troll. And while many fediblock cases are not as clear cut as these, direction of consent remains unchanged.

As much as I see some issues with fediblock and knee-jerking that is sometimes going on there, consent is not an issue here. And I do empathize with admins/mods trying to protect their communities from dangerous/hurtful/abusive crap.

Fediverse admins and mods have a lot of experience dealing with abuse, and part of that experience includes dealing with concerted attacks of abusive people trying to figure out how to go around blocks, etc, to harass people on instances these admins and mods run. But of course it’s easier to dismiss them as “anarchistic dictators” or something. 🤦‍♀️

Thus, it clearly shows again that #FediBlock is solely a pillory to those who seem to have achieved nothing in their lives.

They achieved a fediverse that is genuinely nice to be a part of. This is something that comes up over and over, and over again from people who migrated recently from Twitter. It’s not perfect, and the way things are dealt with will have to change due to the massive influx of new people and instances, but to say they have not achieved anything is disingenuous and demonstrably false.

With that kind of attitude on display here, gee I wonder why people responsible for the well-being of their communities found the tool iffy. 🤔

However, the information about who blocks whom is in many ways more than just interesting for those who want to choose an instance.

Yes, that is something that will need to be handled better. But it will need to be discussed and a solution will have to be found together with admins and moderators of instances, not despite them.


I heard about Galactica being open source here

Well, where is the code? What is the license?

Big Tech has a long history of claiming stuff is “open-source” when in fact it’s anything but. So unless actual code is available under an OSI-approved license, I call BS.

https://github.com/openai/whisper

Interesting. That’s a different Whisper though, no? Also I don’t think OpenAI qualifies as Big Tech, they’ve been doing open-source AI (as the name suggests) for a long while, with the exception of licensing GPT-3 exclusively to MS.


Wait, I don’t see anything about Galactica being open-sourced. Can you point me to a source? I see this though:
https://www.siliconrepublic.com/machines/galactica-meta-ai-large-language-model

I see nothing about Whispers AI being open-sourced either:
https://whisper.ai/

And I see facebook talking about open-sourcing Cicero, but I don’t see any link to code, nor info on the license:
https://about.fb.com/news/2022/11/cicero-ai-that-can-collaborate-and-negotiate-with-you/




> A couple of weeks ago a billionaire, whose skin is apparently as thin as his wallet is thick, took over one of the important public squares on-line. It is a good moment to explore and recognize other dangers, in addition to failure to moderate the public debate, such centralized control creates. Twitter’s tumultuous transition to a privately held company became a lens, focusing — at long last — our collective attention on them. > > These issues are hardly new or unexpected. Activists and experts had been warning about problems related to centralized control of our daily communication tools for years. But by and large, our warnings went unheeded. Today, as we mourn the communities disrupted and connections lost, and grapple with the fallout, we have to recognize this is about more than just Twitter. And use the opportunity to learn not to make the same mistakes again. (...) > We can also build systems that allow people to switch providers without losing contact with their friends and coworkers — e-mail and mobile networks are good, familiar examples of these. The fact that the big social media services, or the huge online productivity providers, do not allow this kind of compatibility is a business decision, rather than a technological necessity. (...) > “Never let a good crisis go to waste”, Winston Churchill once said, and it would serve us well to lean into that wisdom today. A centralized, closed, monopolistic platform’s agony is a good opportunity to reconsider our over-reliance on Big Tech walled gardens in general.

Pewnie. Instancja mastodon.technology też znika za niecały miesiąc (ja swoje konto zbekapowałem). Ale to nadal totalnie inna skala.


No, tylko żadnych bailoutów proszę.

Zamiast tego, wnioski na przyszłość i nie opierać się więcej na zamkniętych ogródkach!


Wow, people here really hate it when facts don’t fit their worldview. 🤣


Jeśli Elon Musk wykończy Twittera, to porozmawiajmy o zaletach i wadach ... Mastodona i Fediverse — OKO.press
> Osoby oczekujące identycznego interfejsu, podobnie działającego algorytmu rekomendacji, czy tych samych kont do śledzenia, tyle że bez Muska, nie znajdą ich na fedi — ale nie znajdą ich dziś również nigdzie indziej. Produkt "Twitter bez Elona" zwyczajnie nie jest już dostępny. > > To jednak niekoniecznie zła nowina. > > Ponieważ Fediverse opiera się na niezależnych serwerach, zarządzanych przez konkretne osoby czy społeczności, znacznie prężniej działa moderacja. (...) > Mastodon (jako oprogramowanie) i Fediverse (jako sieć i społeczność) mają też inne, ważne zalety nad Twitterem. Na przykład, znacznie bardziej używalna (a co za tym idzie, częściej używana) jest funkcja dodawania opisu obrazków. To ważne dla osób niewidomych i niedowidzących, korzystających z czytników ekranu. > > "Jak było nas [osób korzystających z Fediversu] mało, to niemal wszystkie grafiki były opisane" — mówi mi w rozmowie Jacek Zadrożny, ekspert do spraw dostępności, sam korzystający z czytników ekranu. — "Teraz jest gorzej, ale się poprawia. Uciekinierzy z Twittera uczą się tego. (...) > Innym rozwiązaniem dostępnym (i często wykorzystywanym) w Fediwersie, a w zasadzie nieobecnym na Twitterze, są "ostrzeżenia o zawartości" (w skrócie "CW" od ang. "content warning"). (...) > "Wydaje mi się bardzo ciekawe, co się dalej wydarzy" — podsumowuje Alek Tarkowski. — "Otwarte infrastruktury mają ogromny potencjał. Widzę, że trwają prace nad nowymi serwisami, na przykład PeerTube. Pytanie, czy się przyjmą. Dużą rolę widzę tu dla instytucji publicznych. Fajnie, że powraca dyskusja o tym, jak komunikuje się polski rząd".

We can walk and chew gum. We can recognize problems with US imperialism, and problems with Russian imperialism.

And calling 2014 elections a “coup” is denying Ukrainians their agency. I’ve been to Ukraine, I’ve worked with Ukrainians, and I had visited Janukovych’s former residence near Kyiv. A journalism conference is organized there every year these days. 2014 was the Ukrainian people showing the finger to Putin and his lackeys.


The only “world power” (as laughable as it currently is) trying to “conquer” anything right now is Russia. Enough with this Kremlin-propaganda-parotting tankie crap.




Ah, interesting point! I should have thought about it. Thank you.


Edit: as [@poVoq@slrpnk.net](https://slrpnk.net/u/poVoq) points out, this photo might have been taken during the pandemic lockdowns.

cross-posted from: https://szmer.info/post/187347 > > In a world where a single company, which controls the conversations, news feeds, and personal connections of almost two billion people, considers it a good idea to base its post promotion algorithm on how angry a post makes its readers, we can perhaps conclude that the time has come to decentralize our digital communication spaces. Users of a recently-bought social network seem to agree. > > > Those with vested interests in the cryptocurrency space claim to have a solution ready: web3. > > (...) > > > web3 is less a technology project for decentralizing the internet, and more an economic project for a select few to profit from: those who acquire crypto-assets early or have the resources and knowledge to run Ethereum validators > > (...) > > > When radium was first discovered at the end of the 19th century, a whole slew of snake oil products emerged capitalizing on the sensationalism surrounding the new element and its radioactivity. Perhaps the most absurd product was the Doramad Radioactive Toothpaste, whose promotional materials used naïve and distorted notions of “energy” and “radioactive rays,” to market radioactivity as a solution to the very real problem of tooth decay. > > > The analogy is quite compelling. Like radioactivity, blockchain as such can be a useful tool in solving certain kinds of problems. Like dental hygiene, the decentralization of global communication platforms is an important problem, but not necessarily the right application for the instrument. Like Doromad Radioactive Toothpaste, web3 has little to do with solving the stated problem, and everything to do with profiting off of a buzzword, resulting in more harm than good in the process.

> In a world where a single company, which controls the conversations, news feeds, and personal connections of almost two billion people, considers it a good idea to base its post promotion algorithm on how angry a post makes its readers, we can perhaps conclude that the time has come to decentralize our digital communication spaces. Users of a recently-bought social network seem to agree. > Those with vested interests in the cryptocurrency space claim to have a solution ready: web3. (...) > web3 is less a technology project for decentralizing the internet, and more an economic project for a select few to profit from: those who acquire crypto-assets early or have the resources and knowledge to run Ethereum validators (...) > When radium was first discovered at the end of the 19th century, a whole slew of snake oil products emerged capitalizing on the sensationalism surrounding the new element and its radioactivity. Perhaps the most absurd product was the Doramad Radioactive Toothpaste, whose promotional materials used naïve and distorted notions of “energy” and “radioactive rays,” to market radioactivity as a solution to the very real problem of tooth decay. > The analogy is quite compelling. Like radioactivity, blockchain as such can be a useful tool in solving certain kinds of problems. Like dental hygiene, the decentralization of global communication platforms is an important problem, but not necessarily the right application for the instrument. Like Doromad Radioactive Toothpaste, web3 has little to do with solving the stated problem, and everything to do with profiting off of a buzzword, resulting in more harm than good in the process.

cross-posted from: https://szmer.info/post/185455 > > The thing about potential is that you can say it about anything if you don’t really have to back it up.

> The thing about potential is that you can say it about anything if you don’t really have to back it up.

And? Volunteer-run fedi instances are dealing with an unprecendented influx of users. Cut them some slack.


Yeah. That said, I guess the model of interaction on Lemmy is sufficiently different to make that kinda difficult.





cross-posted from: https://szmer.info/post/181638 > > As more and more people are asking me about Mastodon I felt a need for a picture to point at, showcasing how the software known as Mastodon fits into the much larger concept of the Fediverse. I made this visualisation to help myself and others explain the many different use-cases and benefits of different services that can exchange information. > > > ![](https://szmer.info/pictrs/image/dda2f571-b0da-41de-9e64-8b0891e06c11.png)

> As more and more people are asking me about Mastodon I felt a need for a picture to point at, showcasing how the software known as Mastodon fits into the much larger concept of the Fediverse. I made this visualisation to help myself and others explain the many different use-cases and benefits of different services that can exchange information. ![](https://szmer.info/pictrs/image/dda2f571-b0da-41de-9e64-8b0891e06c11.png)


cross-posted from: https://szmer.info/post/149799 > > In the latest illustration of our marvelous new decentralized, resilient blockchain future, one single Solana node apparently was able to take down the entire Solana network. Solana outages are nothing new, and tend to end (as this one did) with Solana issuing instructions to the people who run their validators, asking them all to turn them off and on again. > > > > A validator operator reported that "It appears a misconfigured node caused an unrecoverable partition in the network." It's a bit startling that, in a supposedly decentralized network, one single node can bring the entire network offline.

> In the latest illustration of our marvelous new decentralized, resilient blockchain future, one single Solana node apparently was able to take down the entire Solana network. Solana outages are nothing new, and tend to end (as this one did) with Solana issuing instructions to the people who run their validators, asking them all to turn them off and on again. > > A validator operator reported that "It appears a misconfigured node caused an unrecoverable partition in the network." It's a bit startling that, in a supposedly decentralized network, one single node can bring the entire network offline.


Sygnalista: Jak się przejmuje konta na Twitterze? Proste – dzięki niechlujstwu pracowników Twittera.
cross-posted from: https://szmer.info/post/145418 > > Po przeczytaniu upublicznionych dokumentów trudno nawet krótko podsumować wszystkie kwestie tam wymienione. > > > [W] pierwszym odruchu chcemy machnąć ręką i stwierdzić: „przecież wszyscy tak robią”. Co nam to mówi o stanie przemysłu IT? > > > Bezpieczeństwo informacji najwyraźniej nie jest wystarczającym priorytetem w ogromnych firmach technologicznych. Dopóki wszyscy traktujemy to jako normę i wzruszamy ramionami, nic się nie zmieni. > > > A chyba powinno. Jeśli globalna platforma społecznościowa dopuszcza się tak kardynalnych zaniedbań, to jak wygląda sytuacja u podmiotów zbierających o nas intymne dane za pomocą podłączonych do internetu kamer, zamków do drzwi, dziecięcych lalek, czy… sex-zabawek? > > ----- > > Kilka "kwiatków" z dokumentów od Mudge'a (sporo z nich było już w [tekście Zaufanej Trzeciej Strony](https://zaufanatrzeciastrona.pl/post/wielka-afera-alarmujacy-raport-o-bezpieczenstwie-twittera/) jakiś czas temu): > > > „z ponad 500 000 serwerów w serwerowniach Twittera, ~60% z nich ma nieaktualne systemy operacyjnie. (…) Wiele z tych nieaktualnych systemów operacyjnych nie jest już wspierana przez ich wydawcę.” > > > wyłączenie nawet niewielkiej liczby serwerowni Twittera jednocześnie może spowodować globalną awarię, której naprawienie mogłoby zająć całe miesiące. Inżynierowie Twittera nie są też do końca pewni, czy byliby w stanie w ogóle ponownie uruchomić serwery. > > > „Twitter nie posiada środowisk testowych” (...) zmiany wprowadzane są więc bezpośrednio na serwerach produkcyjnych, z dostępem do prawdziwych danych. > > > „każdy inżynier pracujący w Twitterze, mieszkający w dowolnym kraju, ma obecnie bezpośredni dostęp do systemów produkcyjnych”. Zgodnie z informacjami zawartymi w upublicznionych dokumentach, to obecnie około pięciu tysięcy ludzi. > > > Około 30% laptopów używanych w firmie nie ma włączonych automatycznych aktualizacji bezpieczeństwa. > > > Dramatycznie brakować ma członkiń i członków zespołu władających innymi językami: „Jedna z pytanych osób powiedziała, że mocno polegają na Google Translate”. Zwłaszcza członkiń: „zespoły SI nie są wystarczająco różnorodne, zwłaszcza pod względem płci”; brakuje również osób o zróżnicowanym doświadczeniu, oraz możliwości zrozumienia lokalnego kontekstu w stopniu wystarczającym do oceny publikowanych na platformie treści. > > > „Kierownictwo Twittera wiedziało, że przyjęcie chińskich pieniędzy oznaczało ryzyko stworzenia zagrożenia dla użytkowników w Chinach (…) Kierownictwo firmy rozumiało, że oznaczało to poważny dylemat etyczny. Pan Zatko został poinformowany, że na tym etapie Twitter zbyt mocno polegał na tym źródle przychodów by móc zrobić cokolwiek innego, niż próbować go zwiększyć.”


cross-posted from: https://szmer.info/post/138077 > > In the early hours of September 15, Ethereum completed "The Merge – the long-awaited transition from its original proof-of-work consensus mechanism to proof-of-stake. > > > > Later that day, SEC Chairman Gary Gensler pointed to the staking mechanism as a signal that an asset might be a security as determined by the [Howey test](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SEC_v._W._J._Howey_Co.). > > 🍿

> In the early hours of September 15, Ethereum completed "The Merge – the long-awaited transition from its original proof-of-work consensus mechanism to proof-of-stake. > > Later that day, SEC Chairman Gary Gensler pointed to the staking mechanism as a signal that an asset might be a security as determined by the [Howey test](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SEC_v._W._J._Howey_Co.). 🍿

Fighting Disinformation: We’re Solving The Wrong Problems
> While it is possible to define misinformation and disinformation, any such definition necessarily relies on things that are not easy (or possible) to quickly verify: a news item’s relation to truth, and its authors’ or distributors’ intent. > > This is especially valid within any domain that deals with complex knowledge that is highly nuanced, especially when stakes are high and emotions heat up. Public debate around COVID-19 is a chilling example. Regardless of how much “own research” anyone has done, for those without an advanced medical and scientific background it eventually boiled down to the question of “who do you trust”. Some trusted medical professionals, some didn’t (and still don’t). > > (...) > > Disinformation peddlers are not just trying to push specific narratives. The broader aim is to discredit the very idea that there can at all exist any reliable, trustworthy information source. After all, if nothing is trustworthy, the disinformation peddlers themselves are as trustworthy as it gets. The target is trust itself. > > (...) > > I believe that we are looking for solutions to the wrong aspects of the problem. Instead of trying to legislate misinformation and disinformation away, we should be looking closely at how is it possible that it spreads so fast (and who benefits from this). We should be finding ways to fix the media funding crisis; and we should be making sure that future generations receive the mental tools that would allow them to cut through biases, hoaxes, rhetorical tricks, and logical fallacies weaponized to wage information wars.